Bye Philips Hue & Xiaomi Bridge!

My smart home journey started years ago with a simple Philips Hue configuration. After integrating Home Assistant, I wanted to have some door/window sensors and temperature sensors. I bought the Xiaomi Aqara bridge and implemented all the sensors into Home Assistant. I quickly realized I now have two Zigbee bridges due to the fact that both Philips and Xiaomi want a ‘customized’ standard. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
I needed to do something…

Continue reading “Bye Philips Hue & Xiaomi Bridge!”

Use PowerShell in Azure Functions [Preview]

Microsoft recently announced the Public Preview of the ability to run PowerShell code in an Azure Function. This means that the PowerShell code will run in a Platform-as-a-Service solution, completely serverless! You pay only for the time that you use the solution and you don’t have to manage the underlying infrastructure! In this blog post, I will show a practical example of how to use an Azure Function in combination with an Azure Logic App.

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Migrate to Azure Logic Apps from Microsoft Flow

People who follow me on Twitter might have noticed that I’m working more and more with Microsoft Flow. Microsoft Flow allows me to create simple automations (like IFTTT) and to create a bridge between services like Office 365 and my home automation with Home Assistant. Recent changes to the pricing model made me decide to move away from Microsoft Flow, back to Azure Logic Apps. In this blog post, I’ll explain how easy it is to move your flows to Azure Logic Apps.

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Configuring the new Home Assistant Hass.io 64-bit image on a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+

My last blog post was all about getting Hass.io (or HassIO) installed on the new Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+. This guide starts right where we left off: configuring Home Assistant to work with the configuration files we already have from Home Assistant running on Raspbian. Below are the steps I took in a nutshell.

  • Install and open the Configurator Add-on on Hass.io to make sure you can always open the web UI to change your configurations.
  • Create a snapshot so you can always go back to this point in time.
  • Cut/paste the BaseURL and SSL settings from the configuration.yaml on your old Pi to the new configuration.yaml on your new Pi by using the Configurator add-on. Make sure that you have an SSH session open to the old Pi on the IP address of the old Pi, so you can still copy/paste the contents of various configurations. Also stop the Home Assistant service on your old Raspberry Pi and change any port forwarding rules in your firewall or DNS settings. (Depending on your old setup)
  • Got your Home Assistant ready under the original URL? Create a new snapshot, just to be sure.
  • Start copying the contents of your configuration.yaml and other relevant YAML configurations by grabbing it from SSH and pasting it in the Configurator Add-on. I was surprised to see that all the modules I’ve used before on Raspbian are working fine on Hass.io! So don’t worry too much about that.
  • Go to your Hass.io URL and confirm the dashboard is back to where it was before.

Let me know if this guide helped you out!

Cheers!

Installing the new Home Assistant Hass.IO 64-bit image on a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+

Home Assistant recently announced a brand new image of Hass.IO running on HassOS. I instantly ordered a new Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ to replace my older Raspberry Pi Model B, which was running Raspbian and Home Assistant. The guide below helps you with installing your new Hass.IO instance!

Continue reading “Installing the new Home Assistant Hass.IO 64-bit image on a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+”